A Scouting Life

Jul 31

[video]

Jul 30

howtoseewithoutacamera:

by Steve McCurry
Apartment building in the East Village/Lower East Side. New York City, 1984

Home sweet home.

howtoseewithoutacamera:

by Steve McCurry

Apartment building in the East Village/Lower East Side. New York City, 1984

Home sweet home.

(Source: snowce, via oldnewyork)

vicemag:


An off-beat and beguiling journey into the dark corners of the mind, Go Down Death is something you haven’t seen before. It was shot on black-and-white Super 16mm and filmed in 14 days in an old abandoned paint factory in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. The film feels like it was beamed from another plane of existence. It’s an ensemble piece that takes place entirely on constructed sets of decaying buildings that are inhabited by amputated soldiers, tone-deaf bar singers, child gravediggers, and shape-shifting doctors, all surrounded by an unseen, foreboding presence existing outside the frame.
It’s also the kind of rare filmmaking that sticks with you. I found myself recalling moments from the film—like the howling sound of the wind or a character muttering the line “Ghost haunt me, but I’ll haunt no one”—days after I’d seen it. Perhaps the film’s lasting quality can be attributed to its grim subject matter. There’s a lot of talk of death, disease, and the breakdown of the body. It’s all very exposed and vulnerable. You’ll probably find yourself feeling those qualities after the credits roll.

Do you remember when we interviewed the filmmaker behind Go Down Death a few months back? The film’s now out on iTunes. Check it out! 

This looks like an absolutely amazing film. I pray that I never see it.

vicemag:

An off-beat and beguiling journey into the dark corners of the mind, Go Down Death is something you haven’t seen before. It was shot on black-and-white Super 16mm and filmed in 14 days in an old abandoned paint factory in Greenpoint, Brooklyn. The film feels like it was beamed from another plane of existence. It’s an ensemble piece that takes place entirely on constructed sets of decaying buildings that are inhabited by amputated soldiers, tone-deaf bar singers, child gravediggers, and shape-shifting doctors, all surrounded by an unseen, foreboding presence existing outside the frame.

It’s also the kind of rare filmmaking that sticks with you. I found myself recalling moments from the film—like the howling sound of the wind or a character muttering the line “Ghost haunt me, but I’ll haunt no one”—days after I’d seen it. Perhaps the film’s lasting quality can be attributed to its grim subject matter. There’s a lot of talk of death, disease, and the breakdown of the body. It’s all very exposed and vulnerable. You’ll probably find yourself feeling those qualities after the credits roll.

Do you remember when we interviewed the filmmaker behind Go Down Death a few months back? The film’s now out on iTunes. Check it out! 

This looks like an absolutely amazing film. I pray that I never see it.

Jul 29

Working on a political show is fun

Had a location try to weasel out on me today and had to drop the hammer. You see, we have a lot of guest stars on our show, so when a government agency got cute I hit them with: “What a shame. The Vice President was really looking forward to working at ******. He’s going to be so disappointed to hear that you can’t get it done in time.” Suddenly things got done.

Jul 28

How the Mother of All Sequels Crashed and Burned -

An absolutely batshit insane story about the film business that jibes perfectly with my personal experiences.

westchesterprepster:

confhetti:


she isn’t a smoker, i watched a documentary about the photographer, this is her daughter and she always would take photos of her children and she thought of how out of place yet powerful the cigarette would look in her hands so she took this photo 

Idk how many times I have reblogged this


Sally Mann’s photography of her children is absolutely breathtaking

I let an Ex keep the Sally Mann prints when we broke up.  I shouldn’t have, but was such a shit to her otherwise that I had to.

westchesterprepster:

confhetti:

she isn’t a smoker, i watched a documentary about the photographer, this is her daughter and she always would take photos of her children and she thought of how out of place yet powerful the cigarette would look in her hands so she took this photo 

Idk how many times I have reblogged this

Sally Mann’s photography of her children is absolutely breathtaking

I let an Ex keep the Sally Mann prints when we broke up. I shouldn’t have, but was such a shit to her otherwise that I had to.

(Source: nikolawashere, via rangeedepauvre)

newyorker:

A cartoon by Harry Bliss. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1pAm6nz

newyorker:

A cartoon by Harry Bliss. For more cartoons from this week’s issue: http://nyr.kr/1pAm6nz

(Source: newyorker.com)

mightyflynn:

November 3, 1995

Ian O’Connor: moron

mightyflynn:

November 3, 1995

Ian O’Connor: moron

Jul 27

Where I’ve been…

I have worked all over the place, including but not limited to: New York City, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Memphis, Nashville, New Orleans, Baton Rouge, Chicago, Detroit, Cleveland, Los Angeles, San Francisco, Atlanta, Las Vegas, Denver, Reno, Phoenix, Salt Lake City, North and South Carolina, New Mexico, Boston, Cincinnati, and a whole bunch of other places. All I can say is please, no more Cincinnati. For the love of God please, no more Cincinnati.

My Page, My Soapbox -

conflictedyetcomfortable:

People need to shut the fuck up about Ray Rice. There is nothing I could do to my husband physically and/or verbally that would ever make it okay for him (5’ 10”, 220, about the same size as Rice), to knock me the fuck out. PERIOD. As strong as I am, and I workout, he can subdue me without…

Parenting is a series of “firsts”

First smile, first laugh, first time crawling. Harper said her first word this week, which was “airplane”. Had another one today: first time spraying vomit all over the room like a frigging firehose.

Happy Birthday Josh!

Happy Birthday Josh!

“Here’s the thing that I want to say. The reason that I’m popular or the reason that people follow me and there’s been such a buzz around me is when I went out on Saturdays at Texas A&M, I played with an extreme amount of passion and I played with my heart on my sleeve, but more than anything, I had fun. I have fun playing this game. I have fun going out on this field playing football. It’s what I live for. It’s what I do, same way off the field. Whether I’m playing golf, going out having nightlife, whatever it is, I have a lot of fun. That’s what my life is, and luckily for me I’m living out my dream of playing in the NFL having a ton of fun. My dream has come true, and I finally got some time to get some downtime and celebrate that with my family, with my friends. This is the greatest life that I could have ever imagined for me, and I’m loving that. Will I continue to get better being a professional and learn lessons about life? Of course, I’m 21 years old. Age is not an excuse, but I need to mature and I have done some immature things. Moving forward, I’m going to try and mature and get better and handle myself better as a professional. That’s really all I can say about that. My life is incredible. I’m blessed to be in this position. I’m going to have fun each and every day, whether it’s practice, whether it’s training camp, whether it’s during the season going out and playing a game which will be even better, or it’s going out in the offseason or playing golf or hanging out with my family. Life is fun. Enjoy while it’s here.” — Johnny Manziel

Jul 26

No, it’s 10PM on a Saturday and you’re at home baking bread.

No, it’s 10PM on a Saturday and you’re at home baking bread.

timessquareblue:

Harris Theater, 226 W42nd Street, 1986

timessquareblue:

Harris Theater, 226 W42nd Street, 1986